Helpline (1PM-9PM): 0217126699
Tessellated triangles in inclusive LGBTQIA+ flag colours
Helpline (1PM-9PM): 0217126699
Triangle Project logo -pink downward pointed triangle with gold ribbon in the shape of Table Mountain in Cape Town on the horizon.

Our history

1981  The formation of Triangle Project's predecessor, GASA 6010 (Gay Association of South Africa), by a passionate group of gay men responding to the HIV/AIDS crisis. 1982  Establishment of counselling and medical services, along with a telephone helpline
1984  Pioneering efforts in HIV & AIDS prevention initiatives and literature dissemination across South Africa 1989  Creation of the AIDS Support and Education Trust (ASET) as part of the compassionate response 1994  ASET and counselling services became independent, moving to a community centre for wider accessibility  Pivotal meeting designates ASET as the torchbearer for HIV & AIDS work in the Western Cape's gay and lesbian communities. In 1994, SWEAT (sex worker education and advocacy taskforce) was launched within a Triangle Project programme. By 1996 with rapid growth SWEAT moved out of Triangle Project structures
1996  Symbolic transformation into Triangle Project, reflecting a multifaceted approach  Establishment of the first gay and lesbian health project in a Black African township in Cape Town. In 1996 the 24 hour helpline had been operating since 1982 and known as the “GAY HELPLine”
1997  In 1997 Triangle’s VISION 2000 states that “by the year 2000, any gay or lesbian person living in the Western Cape will be able to access appropriate information and care on gay and lesbian issues (including HIV/STD’s) either directly through Triangle Project’s services or through sensitised structures and contacts operating in their areas”. To address queer folks from rural and township areas being excluded from programmes because of spatial legacies and language barriers, Triangle employed three isiXhosa speakers from these communities to develop capacity. In late 1997 an office was opened in the Uluntu Centre in Gugulethu.  The GASA library was donated to Triangle Project and since mid-1996 cataloguing took place, with the lending library opening at the end of July 1997.
The GASA library was donated to Triangle Project and since mid-1996 cataloguing took place, with the lending library opening at the end of July 1997.  1998  Two major training programmes take place from the Department of Health that Triangle actively participates in; Life Skills programmes in Schools & The Lay Counselling Programme. A significant focus group research study took place with 45 individuals and over 20 volunteers to analyse the complexities around the health needs of queer folks in and around Cape Town. The fieldworker, Bassi was also centrally involved with organising the Gugulethu World Aids Day Committee, which led to an extremely successful event. Triangle also participated in the first ever international lesbian and gay conference to be held on African soil in 1999. 2000  For the second year running Triangle held the “Sex & Kultuur” Fest, celebrating diversity and positivity in queer culture. 2001  the “international year of the Volunteer” Triangle recruited volunteers from all over Cape Town. Volunteers have always played a crucial role in the day-to-day running of Triangle project; from the helpline, face to face counselling, in the library, running the youth groups and distribution of educational materials.  Triangle featured strongly on Bush Radio’s “In the Pink” slot, the first LGBTQIA+ focused
2002  The Emotional wellbeing project was initiated this year in Gugulethu, aimed at supporting unemployed members with job creation and other services.   Two group work concepts were reintroduced. The Living Pozitively group for HIV positive gay men, and the GABY’s group, a group for young gay and bisexual men.
2004-2005  Public Education and Training programmes expanded into more schools and organisations. This included the new educators awareness project, a public education initiative aimed at increasing understanding of sexual orientation and promoting a positive approach in schools. We solidified our profile as a training service provider.
2006-2007  The passing of the Civil Union Act at the end of 2006, where Triangle played a crucial role in campaigning for the legalisation of same-sex marriage through parliamentary submissions, mobilisation, and engaging in media campaigns.
2011  significant increase of outreach work into peri-urban and rural area
2012-2013  Triangle joined the HCWG (hate crimes working group)- a collective of civil society organisations that lead advocacy and reform efforts addressing hate crimes in South Africa and the broader region. 2013-2014  A joint organisational training manual developed by Triangle project was launched “the Trainers guide to the police sensitisation training manual”.
2014-2015  Cape Town TV regularly features HSSP on their youth-centred talk show “EnQueering” every Thursday.
2015-2016  Significant increase in hate crimes in rural areas of the western cape. + Social media posts reached close to 800 000 people in this period.   In 2015, Triangle Project became part of the Khumbulani Pride organized by FreeGender Khayelitsha, countering the segregated mainstream pride in Cape Town. This annual event prioritises the political issues of black LGBTQI+ individuals.
2016-2017  The Health Services and Support Prgramme enhanced their team and outreach with a social worker and nurse.   We also produced our first SOGI policy with SADTU (south african democratic teachers union)   In 2016, Triangle Project identified social movement building as a critical focus area
2017-2018  20 LGBTQI+ political activists completed our groundbreaking training for our Political Leaders Learning Institute (PLLI).   The first ever Queer Feminist Film Festival was held in January 2018 over two days at the Isivivane Centre in Khayelitsha.   A social movement focus became even more urgent in 2017 as orchestrated attempts at promoting 'anti-gender ideology' propaganda emerged in South Africa. 2018-2019  The Department of Social Development gives Triangle an award in recognition of our work to support victims of violence and for monitoring hate crimes.   By 2018, Triangle Project supported 17 solidarity spaces, and four of these spaces transitioned into independent community organisations.
2019-2020  Triangle hosted the first ever Global LBQ Women’s conference in July 2019 in Cape Town.   In 2019, Triangle Project's PLLI alumni formed the SOSS Collective, launching a national campaign for inclusive townships shelters. Advocating for marginalised communities, the collective spotlights the pervasive violence faced by groups like sex workers, trans individuals, LGBTQI+ people, and women both inside and outside homes. 2020-2021  Covid-19 and lockdown increased the need for nutritional assistance by 286%.   Queer identifying learners started organising under the banner of the Phefumla Queer Collective, conducting impactful activism workshops and theatre initiatives.
2021 We made ten submissions on issues of human rights, law and policy reform to Parliament, government and the United Nations. A school LGBTQI+ learner-led artivism program empowers students to advocate for LGBTQI+ learner rights, focusing on gender-based violence and sexual violence. Through multimedia channels like radio, YouTube, and social media, we actively engage the public on SOGIESC topics. Our collaboration with LGBTQI+ networks and thought leaders includes a weekly two-hour slot on Bush Radio for quality programming called the Rainbow Table.  The Activist Leadership Learning Institute (ALLI) began in May 2021 as a year-long political education program. Attended by committed womxn from LGBTQI+ activist collectives, ALLI focuses on intersectional political and social justice work within their communities.
2022  Present: One of South Africa's largest LGBTIQ organisations, offering diverse services to a flourishing community.  Triangle Project, through the 'Creating Inclusive and Affirming Schools' ' (CIAS) Project in the Community Engagement and Empowerment Programme (CEEP), actively promotes a society, particularly in education, that embraces diversity, equity, and inclusion. Utilising an intersectional feminist approach, CIAS envisions an education environment fostering justice-centred solidarity for LGBTQI+ learners, students, educators, and key stakeholders. The project aims to leave a feminist legacy of resistance, working towards a society free of discrimination. To achieve this, CIAS supports schools and educational institutions in building collective power, advocating for equal access to public schools, and challenging various forms of oppression.  During 2022, Triangle staff provided face-to-face health and support services to 1,623 people. Transnational solidarity took centre stage when Uganda passed its disturbing anti-homosexuality bill that aimed to criminalize our existence. And In a historic development, South Africa’s Parliament has passed the amended version of the Hate Crimes and Hate Speech Bill. It will now go to President Cyril Ramaphosa for his signature, Triangle staff continued their leadership role with others in the Hate Crimes Working Group.  As we enter our 2023-2028 strategic plan cycle, we confront the challenges posed by rising anti-gender and anti-LGBTQI+ movements, especially in the lead-up to the 2024 national elections. Recognizing the threat to human rights, our focus over the next five years is to intensify efforts, safeguard hard-won LGBTQI+ rights, and promote equality and inclusion at national and regional levels. This commitment is essential amid growing concerns and the toll on our staff and activists. A central objective is to resource this strategy effectively

+27214220255

info@triangle.org.za

health2@triangle.org.za 

2 - 4 Seymour Street
Observatory
Cape Town
7925

Donate

NPO reg no: 003-971

+27214220255

info@triangle.org.za

health2@triangle.org.za 

2 - 4 Seymour Street
Observatory
Cape Town
7925

Donate

NPO reg no: 003-971